Most people believe that the 21st century simply began at the turn of the millennium, in the year 2000. However, Krzysztof Szczerski, the Secretary of State of Poland, came to Yale to posit that the 21st century actually started at three different times.

“You can argue about the beginning of historical periods by defining the nature of the geopolitical order,” he said.

In his talk entitled “Geopolitics and Europe: A Polish Perspective,” Minister Szczerski drew from his experience as a Polish...

This op-ed written by Timothy Snyder, the Bird White Housum Professor of History, and a member of the European Studies Council at the MacMillan Center, appeared in The New York Times on September 20

The president of Russia, Vladimir V. Putin, once described the collapse of the Soviet Union as a “geopolitical catastrophe.” But the political thinker who today has the most influence on Mr. Putin’s Russia is not Vladimir Lenin, the founder of the Communist system, but rather Ivan Ilyin...

From April to July 1994, Rwanda was embroiled in genocide. Nearly one million people died during the Hutu-lead campaign against the Tutsis. The genocide came to an end when the Rwandan Patriotic Front, led by Paul Kagame, defeated government forces and secured the countryside.

On September 20 Paul Kagame, the now President of Rwanda, came to Yale to give the keynote address for the MacMillan Center’s Coca-Cola World Fund Lecture. (video)...

As political science professor David R. Cameron took the podium before his talk on the implications of Brexit Thursday afternoon, he paused to allow those expecting another David Cameron — the former prime minister of the U.K. — to leave. He laughed when no one left, and then went on.

At the talk, “Brexit: What It Will Mean for the U.K. and the EU,” which drew about 30, the renowned Yale professor discussed the historical relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union, provided...

The terrorism perpetuated by ISIS and other extremist groups reinforces the perception that Islam, a religion with more than 1 billion believers worldwide, has spread over the course of its 1,400-year history through violent conquest.

A new book by Lamin Sanneh, the D. Willis James Professor of Missions and World Christianity at Yale Divinity School and professor of history, offers a different perspective, one drawn from the historical record.

Sanneh’s book, “Beyond Jihad,” explores the...